Where are you?

You might be in your first or second leadership role. 

You might be thinking about applying for a position with more responsibility than you’ve had before.

You might have been doing leadership for ages but just started thinking about it as a topic in itself. 

The word “leadership” is in your job description but no-one has really explained what it means or offered you any training or guidance on it.

You want to make an impact. 

You want to get things done that make a difference. 

You want to bring people with you. Not leave them confused on the sidelines or broken in your wake. 

You’d like some ideas about leadership to think about and work on. 

What it is. What it looks and feels like.  

How to make positive changes while looking after your people. 

If some or all of that is true… 

Welcome. Lead From Where You Are is for you. 

It doesn’t matter if you have a handful of people reporting to you, or a hundred, or none at all. You can lead from where you are. I’d like to help. 

As well as posting here and at leadfromwhereyouare.co.uk  I’m building some resources and hoping to start running some in-person workshops this autumn. 

So tell me… Why are you here? What are your frustrations and challenges? What has worked for you?

Leave me a comment. Let me know how I can help. 

Thanks

#biglove

Coping with uncertainty

How long can you handle things being unclear?

Uncertainty and lack of clarity can be paralysing. “We have to wait until we know how [this thing] will turn out before deciding what to do and how to do it.”

Sometimes the leadership thing to do is cut through uncertainty, identify the key point, create clarity for the team and get things moving forward. 

But.

Often… the thing to do… is wait. 

Live with the uncertainty. Hold the jaws of the situation open for a while. Help your colleagues cope with things being unclear.  

Because sometimes the situation just IS unclear and will remain so. 

Letting things play out, rather than rushing to an answer, can let the context emerge or settle, and opinions shift towards a consensus. Your own understanding and ideas will develop. Eventually the answer can just appear as an obvious truth. 

You have to choose. Decide quickly and get moving? Or live with the uncertainty and let the answers emerge?

Remembering you have this choice is a leadership skill in itself. 

Moments to review and reset

My job is in higher education. Lots of things are tied to an academic year schedule. There’s a rhythm to it that’s helpful. 

Because it gives natural opportunities to assess and reset. 

Whatever your role, wherever you are in the hierarchy, it’s really important to regularly look at your priorities, your plans and your progress. To review the internal and external context. And ask yourself…  

What’s changed? 

What’s finished? 

What’s started?

Do your priorities still make sense? Or has the world moved on?

Are your plans delivering what you thought they would? And is what you thought then still relevant?

So… When is your next opportunity to review and reset? 

Take a moment to identify one to four slots in the year that makes sense with your organisation’s flow of activity and block out a little time to make sure you, and your colleagues, are on the right track.